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1872Manitoba’s first lawyers came to the province as fully qualified members of the legal profession from other jurisdictions and were admitted to practise upon proving their qualifications.Read more...

1911In 1911, a group of reading students sent the Law Society Secretary a petition challenging the results of a series of “unfair” exams. The need to provide better legal education for students in Manitoba became increasingly evident.Read more...
1912Sissons and WiltonRead more...
1914 Largely as a result of the efforts of the Hon. H.A. Robson and E.K. Williams, under the endorsement of the University of Manitoba and the Law Society of Manitoba, the Manitoba Law School came into existence.Read more...
1916Isabel Maclean Hunt became the first woman in Manitoba to receive an LL.B. degree. She was also the first woman in Manitoba to be named Queen’s Council, receiving that honour in 1953.Read more...
1919A deadly influenza outbreak, took the lives of hundreds of people in Winnipeg. A government degree ordered every school and university in the province to close.Read more...
1926From 1926-29 the Law School was without a dean. H.A. Robson was appointed Acting Dean during this time, taking charge of the day-to-day operations of the school with the help of Edwin Loftus, K.C.Read more...
1930In 1930, the school graduated just one individual, Charland Purd’homme. This resulted in the need to increase tuition fees.
Despite this, there were many notable graduates of the 1930s.
Read more...
1939During WWII, Harvey Streight was tasked with POW supervision in Canada, and Frederick Read worked in the office of the Custodian of Enemy Alien Property in Ottawa.Read more...
1945 In in the fall of 1945, R.J. Russell, the School’s Recorder since 1918, resigned from the position due to ill health. Col. Harvey Streight, who had just returned from military service, was named Recorder commencing December 1, 1945.Read more...
1949 The LL.M. programme had been requested by members of the profession for years, and was in keeping with the nature of the school. It was part-time and involved two years of evening courses and examinations, plus a thesis.
1953The Board of Trustees decided to forego the annual financial contributions from the Law Society and the University. As a result, the Manitoba Law School was committed to a policy of self-support. Read more...
1960The School suffered a sad loss with the sudden death of Colonel Streight. His duties as Recorder were very ably taken over by Professor Edwards. A.J. Christie retired as Librarian the same year, and was replaced by M.J. Carey.Read more...
1964Adoption of the three year full-time curriculum gave rise to a number of other changes. The LL.M. course was terminated in order to free the teaching staff to concentrate on improving the undergraduate program.Read more...
1965
Lord Denning Lecture
The inaugural Manitoba Law School Foundation lecture. Sept. 15, 1965.Read more...
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1969
Robson Hall Grand Opening
Click below to view some of the photos from that day.
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1969 The trustees of Robson Hall named the new faculty library, located on the top floor, in recognition of E.K. Williams and his tireless work for the Manitoba Law School. Read more...
1970 In 1970, the faculty introduced a Legal Aid Clinic to help expose law students to real legal situations. Initiated by a student, Justice Robert Carr, ’71, and initially supervised by law practioner, Al McGregor, Q.C., ’67, it was a first, at the time there was no provincial Legal Aid program.
1977 In 1977, Marion Meadmore Ironquil earned her law degree and became the first Indigenous woman to be called to the bar in Canada. As a lawyer, she helped to establish the Canadian Indian Lawyer Association, now the Indigenous Bar Association. She was awarded the Order of Canada in 1985.
1979At the request of the Admissions and Education Committee of the Law Society of Manitoba and the University of Manitoba, Mr. Justice R. Matas put out a publication titled the “Report of the Special Committee on Legal Education”.Read more...
1989 The Faculty began a major fundraising campaign for its Law Endowment Fund as part of the University’s 42 million dollar Drive for Excellence. This fund supports opportunities for students to solidify their classroom learning through community engagement, international learning and service opportunities.
1999 The Asper Foundation established the Asper Chair in International Business and Trade Law at the University of Manitoba"s Faculty of Law with an endowment gift of $2 million. Read more...
2006 In 2006, The Marcel A. Desautels Centre for Private Enterprise and the Law was created.Read more...
2011In 2011, the LL.B (Bachelor of Laws) degree was changed to a J.D. (Juris Doctor) degree.Read more...
The Legal Help Centre opened its door to the public.
2012 The Centre for Human Rights Research Initiative (CHRR) brings people together, igniting collaboration, energizing interdisciplinary connections and providing exciting education and training opportunities for students. Read more...
The Robson Hall ReportThe Faculty’s first annual, stand-alone Alumni magazine was established in 2012.Read more...

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The Manitoba Law School was jointly sponsored by The University of Manitoba and the Law Society of Manitoba; both bodies took part in the planning from the beginning. In the summer of 1914 they entered into an agreement, subsequently endorsed by legislation, which provided for the creation of the School, offering a three-year course consisting of lectures and apprenticeship leading to both an LL.B. degree and a call to the Bar and admission to practice. Expenses of the School were shared equally by the two parent bodies, and its operations were supervised by a jointly appointed Board of Trustees. This arrangement between The University of Manitoba and the Law Society of Manitoba continued until 1966 when the Law School became the Faculty of Law of The University of Manitoba.